COULD FAMILY BREAKFAST GIVE KIDS GOOD BODY IMAGE?

COULD FAMILY BREAKFAST GIVE KIDS GOOD BODY IMAGE?

(Credit: Getty Images)

Eating breakfast as a family can help promote a positive body image
for children and adolescents, a new study suggests.

“We know that developing healthy behaviors in adolescence such as
eating breakfast every day and eating family meals can have long-term effects
into adulthood,” says Virginia Ramseyer Winter, assistant professor
in the School of Social Work and director of the Center for
Body Image Research and Policy at the University of Missouri.

“Children and adolescents are under a lot of pressure from social media and
pop culture when it comes to physical appearance. Having a healthy relationship
with food from eating breakfast and spending meal time with family
might have a significant impact on well-being.”

For the study, which appears in Social Work in Public Health, researchers analyzed
data from more than 12,000 students in more than 300 schools in all 50 states and
Washington, DC. They looked at data related to eating behaviors, including frequency
of eating breakfast and eating meals with a parent.

The researchers found that eating breakfast during the week more frequently was
associated with positive body image. Just over half of the sample reported eating
breakfast five days a week; however, nearly 17 percent reported never eating breakfast.
More than 30 percent reported eating breakfast fewer than five times a week.
Also, boys ate breakfast more often than girls did.

Additionally, children were much more likely to have a positive body image
if they regularly ate breakfast with a parent.

“We know that the health behaviors of a parent can have long-term effects on a child,”
Ramseyer Winter says. “Results of this study suggest that positive interactions with food—
such as eating breakfast and having family meals together—could be associated with body image.”

Additional researchers from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville and Washburn University
contributed to the study.

Source: University of Missouri

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *